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Forum Replies

  1. Aaaah now I see the light !!! Thanks Andrew you have been a great help.

  2. Hi Rene,

    This is all I have to say, THANK YOU! :clap::clap::clap:

    Complicated concepts, made very objective.

  3. Hello Dennis

    Yes, what you're saying is correct.

    1) R1 will advertise a distance of 25 to the destination to R3 because it learned this distance from R2.
    2) Similarly, R1 will advertise a distance of 12 to the destination to R2 because it learned this from R3.

    So, R1 will always give the distance to the destination to each router that it did not learn from that particular router.

    I hope this has been helpful!

    Laz

  4. Hello Hany

    Can you let us know which topology you labbed up so that we can help you out? Rene has three different tolologies in this lesson.

    Thanks!

    Laz

  5. Hello again Hany

    So, in the original setup, with split horizon functioning, R3 will advertise the destination network to R1 and R2, however, R1 and R2 will not re-advertise the destination back to R3 because of the split horizon rule. This is why you can't see these routes in the topology table. Now I noticed that @ReneMolenaar had the following list of advertisements that would occur:

    R4 will advertise the destination network to R3.
    R3 will advertise the network to R1 and R2.
    R1 will advertise the network to R2.
    R2 will advertise the network to R1.
    R1 will advertise this network back to R3.
    R2 will advertise this network back to R3.

    The last two should not occur, since the split horizon rule is in effect. I will let @ReneMolenaar know about this issue.

    If you forced R3 not to advertise to R1, then R1 will learn of the destination from R2 and R2 from R3. So, R2 can advertise to R3 without violating the split horizon rule.

    Under normal circumstances, you shouldn't need to manually change what R3 is advertising to R1, split horizon will take care of avoiding loops.

    I hope this has been helpful!

    Laz

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