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Forum Replies

  1. Hello Bahri

    I assume it is this topology that you are talking about:

    //cdn-forum.networklessons.com/uploads/default/original/2X/5/5eb171abd5df46058f7e1baeb62d7a29ab3a3ab6.png

    Essentially, the three routers are connected not as a point to point connection (obviously, since there are more than two interconnected devices), but as a multiple access network. This multiple access network can be interconnected by switches or any number of layer two devices. So in between the three routers there can indeed be a switch or any number of switches interconnecting these r

    ... Continue reading in our forum

  2. Hi Rene,

    I have Problems with that.
    2 Inside Routers form iBGP over EIGRP(announcing Loopback). EIGRP is running between the Routers on their HSRP addresses:
    Router 1 10.10.10.1
    HSRP VIP 10.10.10.2
    Router 2 10.10.10.3
    –> forming EIGRP 10.10.10.1<->10.10.10.3 and Advertising Loopbacks for BGP
    All good so far.
    Every Router is connected to ISP(same AS but does not matter here) which give a default route only to each inside Router.
    That means both inside Routers have default to ISP, but when 1 inside Router chrashes, BGP is not deleted between inside Routers. EIGRP

    ... Continue reading in our forum

  3. Hi Alexander,

    If you use private IP addresses on your network then in this case, traffic could match your default route and is forwarded to the ISP. They’ll drop it though since they don’t route private IP addresses.

    If you want to prevent this, you could configure some null0 routes for your private ranges. When the router doesn’t have a more specific entry, it will drop the traffic instead of using the default route.

    Rene

  4. Hello Alexander

    Yes, I believe your description would would indeed provide the desired result.

    Laz

  5. My bad. Indeed oldest path is selected before router ID. :slight_smile: Many thanks Rene!

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