BGP Prevent Transit AS

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By default BGP will advertise all prefixes to EBGP (External BGP) neighbors. This means that if you are multi-homed (connected to two or more ISPs) that you might become a transit AS. Let me show you an example:

R1 two ISPs 3 loopbacks

R1 is connected to ISP1 and ISP2 and each router is in a different AS (Autonomous System). Since R1 is multi-homed it’s possible that the ISPs will use R1 to reach each other. In order to prevent this we’ll have to ensure that R1 only advertises prefixes from its own autonomous system.

As far as I know there are 4 methods how you can prevent becoming a transit AS:

  • Filter-list with AS PATH access-list.
  • No-Export Community.
  • Prefix-list Filtering
  • Distribute-list Filtering

Prefix-lists or distribute-lists will work but it’s not a very scalable solution if  you have thousands of prefixes in your BGP table. The filter-list and no-export community work very well since you only have to configure them once and it will not matter if new prefixes show up. First we’ll configure BGP on each router:

R1(config)#router bgp 1
R1(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.12.2 remote-as 2
R1(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.13.3 remote-as 3
ISP1(config)#router bgp 2
ISP1(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.12.1 remote-as 1
ISP2(config)#router bgp 3
ISP2(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.13.1 remote-as 1

The commands above will configure EBGP (External BGP) between R1 – ISP1 and R1 – ISP2. To make sure we have something to look at, I’ll advertise the loopback interfaces in BGP on each router:

R1(config)#router bgp 1
R1(config-router)#network 1.1.1.0 mask 255.255.255.0
ISP1(config)#router bgp 2
ISP1(config-router)#network 2.2.2.0 mask 255.255.255.0
ISP2(config)#router bgp 3
ISP2(config-router)#network 3.3.3.0 mask 255.255.255.0

With the networks advertised, let’s take a look at the BGP table of ISP1 and ISP2 to see what they have learned:

ISP1#show ip bgp 
BGP table version is 4, local router ID is 11.11.11.11
Status codes: s suppressed, d damped, h history, * valid, > best, i - internal,
              r RIB-failure, S Stale
Origin codes: i - IGP, e - EGP, ? - incomplete

   Network          Next Hop            Metric LocPrf Weight Path
*> 1.1.1.0/24       192.168.12.1             0             0 1 i
*> 2.2.2.0/24       0.0.0.0                  0         32768 i
*> 3.3.3.0/24       192.168.12.1                           0 1 3 i
ISP2#show ip bgp 
BGP table version is 4, local router ID is 33.33.33.33
Status codes: s suppressed, d damped, h history, * valid, > best, i - internal,
              r RIB-failure, S Stale
Origin codes: i - IGP, e - EGP, ? - incomplete

   Network          Next Hop            Metric LocPrf Weight Path
*> 1.1.1.0/24       192.168.13.1             0             0 1 i
*> 2.2.2.0/24       192.168.13.1                           0 1 2 i
*> 3.3.3.0/24       0.0.0.0                  0         32768 i

The ISP routers have learned about each other networks and they will use R1 as the next hop. We now have everything in place to play with the different filtering techniques.

Filter-list with AS PATH access-list

Using an filter-list with the AS PATH access-list is probably the most convenient solution. It will ensure that you will always only advertise prefixes from your own autonomous system. Here’s how to do it:

R1(config)#ip as-path access-list 1 permit ^$

R1(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.12.2 filter-list 1 out
R1(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.13.3 filter-list 1 out

The ^$ regular expression ensures that we will only advertise locally originated prefixes. We’ll have to apply this filter to both ISPs.

Keep in mind that BGP is slow…if you are doing labs, it’s best to speed things up with clear ip bgp *

Let’s verify our configuration:

R1#show ip bgp 
BGP table version is 4, local router ID is 22.22.22.22
Status codes: s suppressed, d damped, h history, * valid, > best, i - internal,
              r RIB-failure, S Stale
Origin codes: i - IGP, e - EGP, ? - incomplete

   Network          Next Hop            Metric LocPrf Weight Path
*> 1.1.1.0/24       0.0.0.0                  0         32768 i
*> 2.2.2.0/24       192.168.12.2             0             0 2 i
*> 3.3.3.0/24       192.168.13.3             0             0 3 i

R1 still knows about the prefixes from the ISP routers. What about ISP1 and ISP2?

ISP1#show ip bgp 
BGP table version is 7, local router ID is 11.11.11.11
Status codes: s suppressed, d damped, h history, * valid, > best, i - internal,
              r RIB-failure, S Stale
Origin codes: i - IGP, e - EGP, ? - incomplete

   Network          Next Hop            Metric LocPrf Weight Path
*> 1.1.1.0/24       192.168.12.1             0             0 1 i
*> 2.2.2.0/24       0.0.0.0                  0         32768 i
ISP2#show ip bgp 
BGP table version is 7, local router ID is 33.33.33.33
Status codes: s suppressed, d damped, h history, * valid, > best, i - internal,
              r RIB-failure, S Stale
Origin codes: i - IGP, e - EGP, ? - incomplete

   Network          Next Hop            Metric LocPrf Weight Path
*> 1.1.1.0/24       192.168.13.1             0             0 1 i
*> 3.3.3.0/24       0.0.0.0                  0         32768 i

ISP1 and ISP2 only know about the 1.1.1.0 /24 network. Excellent, we are no longer a transit AS! On to the next method…

No-Export Community

Using the no-export community will also work pretty well. We will configure R1 so that prefixes from the ISP routers will be tagged with the no-export community. This ensures that the prefixes from those routers will be known within AS 1 but won’t be advertised to other routers.

R1(config)#route-map NO-EXPORT
R1(config-route-map)#set community no-export

R1(config)#router bgp 1
R1(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.12.2 route-map NO-EXPORT in
R1(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.13.3 route-map NO-EXPORT in
I’m only using one router in AS 1, if you have other routers and are running IBGP (Internal BGP) then don’t forget to send communities to those routers with the neighbor <ip> send-community command.

Let’s see what ISP1 and ISP2 think about our configuration:

ISP1#show ip bgp 
BGP table version is 11, local router ID is 11.11.11.11
Status codes: s suppressed, d damped, h history, * valid, > best, i - internal,
              r RIB-failure, S Stale
Origin codes: i - IGP, e - EGP, ? - incomplete

   Network          Next Hop            Metric LocPrf Weight Path
*> 1.1.1.0/24       192.168.12.1             0             0 1 i
*> 2.2.2.0/24       0.0.0.0                  0         32768 i
ISP2#show ip bgp 
BGP table version is 11, local router ID is 33.33.33.33
Status codes: s suppressed, d damped, h history, * valid, > best, i - internal,
              r RIB-failure, S Stale
Origin codes: i - IGP, e - EGP, ? - incomplete

   Network          Next Hop            Metric LocPrf Weight Path
*> 1.1.1.0/24       192.168.13.1             0             0 1 i
*> 3.3.3.0/24       0.0.0.0                  0         32768 i

They only know about network 1.1.1.0 /24. Onto the next method!

Prefix-List Filtering

Using a prefix-list we can determine what prefixes are advertised to our BGP neighbors. This works fine but it’s not a good solution to prevent becoming a transit AS. Each time you add new prefixes you’ll have to reconfigure the prefix-list. Anyway let me show you how it works:

R1(config)#ip prefix-list NO-TRANSIT permit 1.1.1.0/24

R1(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.12.2 prefix-list NO-TRANSIT out 
R1(config-router)#neighbor 192.168.13.3 prefix-list NO-TRANSIT out

The prefix-list above will only advertise 1.1.1.0 /24 to the ISP routers. Let’s verify the configuration:



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17 Responses to “BGP Prevent Transit AS”

  1. Andres September 10, 2013 at 03:59 #

    Thanks for the labs Rene, I appreciate all the time you take out of your day to create these labs for us. I always forget about the BGP regular expressions so I printed them out this time.

  2. Georg February 8, 2014 at 01:57 #

    Many thanks for the lesson, it’s very easy to understand!

  3. NorthPaladin February 8, 2014 at 18:43 #

    What about this method, Rene?

    access-list 1 permit 1.1.1.0 0.0.0.255

    route-map NO-EXPORT permit 10
    match ip address 1

    neighbor 192.168.12.2 route-map NO-EXPORT out
    neighbor 192.168.13.3 route-map NO-EXPORT out

    Ofc we can use “match ip address prefix-list” as well. And my deepest respect for all what you do for us all.

  4. Ulhas April 6, 2014 at 20:48 #

    Nice!!! It cleared my questions!!! Thanks a ton!!!

  5. Arijit May 21, 2014 at 13:56 #

    Hello Rene,

    I have gone through many topics in this website and that cleared my idea as well but I don’t see any note regarding Multiple Spanning-Tree Protocol.
    If you share some labs/note for MSTP will be helpful for me to understand it better.

    Thanks a lot.

    • Admin May 23, 2014 at 14:49 #

      Hello Arijit,

      I’m glad to hear that you like it. I’ll add some MST material in the future!

      Rene

  6. Marcus May 22, 2014 at 15:31 #

    Thanks a million Rene!! I really appreciate you sharing your knowledge, this really helped me out a lot.

  7. Emmanuel July 3, 2014 at 16:07 #

    You have really cleared the air on some difficulties i was having.
    Really self explanatory.
    Thx Renee

  8. Behzad August 27, 2014 at 14:43 #

    This really helped me :)
    Thanks a lot Rene

  9. Mauro P April 30, 2015 at 21:45 #

    Nice and neat, i like it :)

  10. Hamood R June 26, 2015 at 00:07 #

    Rene,

    Nice and clear explanation of all the complex BGP terms.
    Great lesson to understand key features of BGP.

    Thanks
    Hamood

  11. Nav N August 9, 2015 at 23:31 #

    Hi,

    I would appreciate if you can talk about how to advertise routes toward inside your network.

    let say you have r1 and r2 are mutihome. R1 to isp1 and R2 to isp2 (getting bgp full table). Now let say you have R1 and R2 criss cross connected to nexus 7k inbound. I know you can run iBGP but that would be too many routes to your switches. What would be a good solution in this situation?

    Thanks,
    Nav

    • Rene Molenaar August 10, 2015 at 19:45 #

      Hi Nav,

      If R1 and R2 are the only exit points for your network then a default route will do the job, no need to run iBGP on all your internal devices.

      Rene

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